Cody Alan
Cody Alan
12:00am - 6:00am
After Midnight with Cody Alan
Request A Song
My Profile
  Toll Free: 1-800-585-3515 Sunday January 25, 2015  
 
Infinite Menus, Copyright 2006, OpenCube Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Carroll Broadcasting
WKJC FM 104.7 - Tawas
WIOS AM 1480 - Tawas
HIT'S 103.3 FM - Tawas
HIT'S 94.9 FM - Alpena





If you Missed

Sunrise Side Today, just click on the Podcast Button

Above!


Where to Go...

& What to Do...

in N.E. Michigan!




Click on Tawas Lighthouse




National News
Subscribe To This Feed

F-16s Scrambled to Escort Jets After Twitter Bomb Threat


Ivan Cholakov/Hemera/Thinkstock(ATLANTA) --Two F-16 fighter jets were scrambled on Saturday to escort two airliners enroute to Hartsfeld-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta for a possible bomb threat, NORAD said.

The fighters from McEntire Joint National Guard Base in South Carolina were dispatched at 1 p.m. ET and escorted the planes to Hartsfeld, where they both landed safely, NORAD spokesman Preston Schlachter said.

The fighters escorted both aircraft from a distance behind until they landed.

After landing teams swept the planes for explosive devices and passengers were scheduled to be interviewed by investigators. Video of the scene appeared to show passengers leaving the plane with their carry-on luggage.

The two passenger flights were Delta 1156 from Portland and Southwest 2492 from Milwaukee.

The threats appear to have originated from the Twitter handle @kingZortic, according to officials familiar with the incident. The account only has 11 tweets, 10 of which appear to be related to threats against Delta and Southwest Airlines.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Patriots Coach Says 'Climatic Conditions' May Have Under-Inflated Balls


Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images(FOXBOROUGH, Mass.) -- New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick said on Saturday taht "climatic conditions" may have been to blame for the footballs that were under-inflated Sunday for the AFC Championship game, and said the team had not tried to tamper with them.

He said the team "followed the rules to the letter," denying any intentional wrongdoing by the Patriots.

"At no time was there any intent whatsoever to try to compromise the integrity of the game or to gain an advantage," Belichick said.

The NFL acknowledged for the first time Friday that the Patriots used under-inflated balls in the first half of Sunday's game against the Indianapolis Colts, a game the Patriots won 45-7 to advance to the Super Bowl.

"While the evidence thus far supports the conclusion that footballs that were under-inflated were used by the Patriots in the first half, the footballs were properly inflated for the second half and confirmed at the conclusion of the game to have remained properly inflated," the league said in a statement.

"The goals of the investigation will be to determine the explanation for why footballs used in the game were not in compliance with the playing rules and specifically whether any noncompliance was the result of deliberate action. We have not made any judgments on these points and will not do so until we have concluded our investigation and considered all of the relevant evidence," the league said, adding that it has conducted nearly 40 interviews, including "Patriots personnel, game officials, and third parties with relevant information and expertise."  

The NFL also said it is continuing to look the matter ahead of next week's Super Bowl.

In a statement Friday, Patriots owner Bob Kraft said, "Immediately after receiving the letter [from the NFL on Monday], I instructed our staff to be completely cooperative and transparent with the league's investigators. During the three days they were here, we provided access to every full- and part-time employee the league's representatives requested to speak with and produced every communication device that they requested to search. It is an ongoing process that the league and our team are taking very seriously. ... Competitive balance and the integrity of the game are the foundation of what makes our league so special and I have the utmost respect for those principles. Our organization will continue to cooperate throughout the league's investigation. Meanwhile, our players, coaches and staff will continue to focus on our preparations for Super Bowl XLIX and the many challenges we face as we prepare for the Seattle Seahawks."

Earlier this week, Belichick and Patriots quarterback Tom Brady denied knowing that the footballs used at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts, were deflated.

Belichick said today the Patriots "welcome" the NFL's investigation of the incident.

The NFL's guidelines dictate that a ball must be inflated to about 12.5 and 13.5 pounds per square inch and weigh between 14 and 15 ounces.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Sexual Assaults Under Investigation at Iowa State University


Gloda/iStock/Thinkstock(AMES, Iowa) -- Iowa State students are being alerted about two recent reports of sexual assaults on campus.  

The first incident happened on Jan. 17 at a fraternity house.  The second assault happened last Monday at a residence hall, according to ABC News affiliate WOI-DT-TV.

Jason Tuttle of the Ames Police Department told the television station that police have executed a search warrant of the frat house.

“We search for any type of items that could have DNA on them.  It could be bedding. It could be underwear,” said Tuttle.

College campuses across the nation are now required to warn students of any ongoing threat against them, but those alerts left some like graduate student Maria Alcvivar unsettled.

"Just reading that made me afraid a little bit,” said Alcvivar. “It's still upsetting because nobody deserves to go through anything like that.”

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

New York Man Dead After Killing Three, Including Daughter: Police


New York Police Department(NEW YORK) -- A New York City man accused of shooting two of his daughters, his girlfriend, and her mother as they slept - killing three of them - was found dead hours later.

Jonathon Walker was found in car near John F. Kennedy International Airport on Saturday, according to New York City police. His cause of death wasn't immediately released.

Investigators say Walker, 34, shot the four early Saturday morning inside their bedroom at their home in the Springfield Gardens neighborhood of Queens.

Police identified the three killed as 62-year-old Viola Warren, 31-year-old Shantai Hale, and 7-year-old Kayla Walker.

His 12-year-old daughter survived and told officers what happened, according to the NYPD. She was taken to a nearby hospital in critical condition.

Police say they all were shot in the head as they slept.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Hero Paramedics Save Man Whose Heart Stopped on Flight to Houston


Orange County Fire Authority(HOUSTON) -- Two paramedics on a flight from Southern California to Houston saved the life of a fellow passenger whose heart had stopped beating.

Donovan George and Alex Van swung into action on Friday when the Florida man in his 70s collapsed on the flight out of John Wayne Airport.

The Orange County paramedics happened to be on board United Flight 333 with their canines for a search-and-rescue conference being held by the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

The man was en route home via Houston when he stood up and felt light-headed and dizzy.

"He was really pale in color and he was sweating profusely," said Van. "I started noticing that he's not breathing, he does not have a pulse. I immediately started CPR ."

Van and George hooked the man up to an IV and an auto-external defibrillator provided by the flight crew.

The plane was diverted to Phoenix, where the man was taken to a hospital. He was alert and talking, said the paramedics.

"It doesn't matter if you're 30,000 feet up in the air or on the side of a freeway or in someone's home, our skill set allows us to help people in need when they need it," said George.

"This is not a career. It's a way of life," said Van. "Wherever you go, you will have to respond."


Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Maryland Mansion Fire: Searchers Find Fifth Body


Obtained by ABC News(ANNAPOLIS, Md.) -- Investigators found a fifth body in the rubble of a mansion in Annapolis, Maryland, that caught fire earlier this week.

The fifth body found at the home of Don and Sandra Pyle wasn't immediately identified by the Anne Arundel County Fire Department. The Pyle's 16,000-square-foot home caught fire Monday morning and quickly spread throughout the structure.

The couple had four of their grandchildren - Alexis (Lexi) Boone, 8; Kaitlyn (Katie) Boone, 7; Charlotte Boone, 8; and, Wesley (Wes) Boone, 6 - at their home at the time, according to relatives. All six are believed to have died in the four-alarm fire, though it's unclear what caused the blaze.

Relatives described Don and Sandra Pyle as loving grandparents nicknamed “Pop-Pop” and “Dee-Dee,” respectively, who loved the Baltimore Ravens and Orioles, as well as traveling.

In a statement released Thursday, members of the Boone and Pyle families thanked those who have offered them comfort but added, "Our loss demands time and quiet reflection to process these feelings. We ask that you respect our need for privacy.

"Life is fragile," their statement read. "Make time today to embrace your loved ones."

Don and Sandra Pyle had spend the night before the blaze treating the children to a special night at the Medieval Times restaurant, according to a family spokeswoman. The couple also took the children to Target so they could get costumes before going to the restaurant.

The fire is being handled as a criminal investigation, said officials. The U.S. Department of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives also sent investigators.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

VIN Cloning: How Thieves Can Steal Your Car's Identity


ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Every year there are 700,000 car thefts in the United States, according to the FBI. Experts say many of those stolen cars are chopped up and sold for parts, but there's another way of selling a stolen car that’s even more profitable for car thieves.

It's called VIN Cloning, and it's a clever and popular scheme, according to the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) and Carfax, a company which makes vehicle history reports.

Here’s how it works: thieves steal a car. Then to mask the theft, they take a vehicle identification number or VIN number, from another similar make and model of car and make counterfeit VIN plates (see photo) that they will install onto the stolen car.

That's the big problem with VIN cloning is it leaves several innocent victims in its wake.

One of those victims was Mike Cella, a retired school teacher and football coach. Last November he went to trade in his 2008 GMC Yukon Denali for a new one, but received shocking news about his SUV instead.

A car dealer in Massachusetts said he couldn’t give Cella the full Blue Book trade-in value for his truck because a Carfax report showed that it had been in four accidents.

"I looked at him and said, ‘What are you nuts?’” Cella, 64, told ABC News. "He says, 'Well, your car shows up in Wisconsin.'"

Four accidents? Wisconsin? Cella knew something strange was going on.

It was. It turns out that over seven years ago, according to West Palm Beach County Sheriff's office, two thieves stole a 2007 GMC Yukon Denali similar to Cella's. Later on, thieves cloned a copy of Cella's VIN number and put it on the stolen Yukon Denali to mask the theft. The car was sold and switched several hands, and over the past seven years it’s been in four accidents, according to its Carfax report.

"It's a very expensive crime and there's a whole bunch of victims involved here," NICB Senior Special Agent Buzz Burzynski told ABC News.

The stolen Yukon Denali finally ended up in the hands of a woman named Misty, who asked that her last name be withheld. She unknowingly bought the SUV from an equally-duped dealership in a small town in Wisconsin –- and it has the identical VIN number as Cella’s truck. Two trucks, one VIN.

"It’s just crazy that something like this happens in a small town," Misty said.

In most states, drivers like Misty who buy the stolen clone are left holding the bag after the vehicle is seized by police.

"After the police take your vehicle, it’s your problem," Burzynski said. "You lost your car. You lost your money. So sorry for you. You have to get an attorney and try to be made whole by the people who sold the vehicle to you.”

But lucky for Misty, Wisconsin law mandates that the car dealer who sells someone a car with a stolen VIN number must pay the customer back, according to the NICB.

The people behind the West Palm Beach Denali theft have not been identified.

"I've got to give them credit though. The way they did it is pretty smart," says Cella. "Pretty clever."

Clever or not, buying a clone can be avoidable. Here are some helpful tips to help protect yourself:

  • Check the VIN in multiple places on the car for mismatches or signs of tampering.
  • Make sure the seller’s name and VINs match on all vehicle docs (title, registration, insurance, etc.).
  • Get a vehicle history report such as Carfax. Investigate further if something fishy comes up.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

NFL Says New England Patriots Used Under-Inflated Balls in First Half


Patriots' Tom Brady on Sunday, January 18, 2015. Elsa/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The National Football League acknowledged for the first time on Friday that the New England Patriots used under-inflated balls in the first half of Sunday's game against the Indianapolis Colts and that it is continuing to look into the matter ahead of next week's Super Bowl.

"While the evidence thus far supports the conclusion that footballs that were under-inflated were used by the Patriots in the first half, the footballs were properly inflated for the second half and confirmed at the conclusion of the game to have remained properly inflated," the NFL said in a statement. "The goals of the investigation will be to determine the explanation for why footballs used in the game were not in compliance with the playing rules and specifically whether any noncompliance was the result of deliberate action. We have not made any judgments on these points and will not do so until we have concluded our investigation and considered all of the relevant evidence."

The statement stops short of saying the Patriots deflated the balls.

In a statement Friday afternoon, Patriots owner Bob Kraft said, "Immediately after receiving the letter [from the NFL on Monday], I instructed our staff to be completely cooperative and transparent with the league’s investigators. During the three days they were here, we provided access to every full- and part-time employee the league’s representatives requested to speak with and produced every communication device that they requested to search. It is an ongoing process that the league and our team are taking very seriously. ... Competitive balance and the integrity of the game are the foundation of what makes our league so special and I have the utmost respect for those principles. Our organization will continue to cooperate throughout the league’s investigation. Meanwhile, our players, coaches and staff will continue to focus on our preparations for Super Bowl XLIX and the many challenges we face as we prepare for the Seattle Seahawks.”

Earlier this week, Patriots coach Bill Belichick and quarterback Tom Brady have denied knowing that the footballs used at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts, were deflated.

The NFL’s guidelines dictate that a ball must be inflated to about 12.5 and 13.5 pounds per square inch and weigh between 14 and 15 ounces.

The league also said, "The playing rules are intended to protect the fairness and integrity of our games. We take seriously claims that those rules have been violated and will fully investigate this matter without compromise or delay. The investigation is ongoing, will be thorough and objective, and is being pursued expeditiously. In the coming days, we expect to conduct numerous additional interviews, examine video and other forensic evidence, as well as relevant physical evidence."

On Tuesday, ESPN reported 11 of the Patriots' 12 allotted game footballs were underinflated by two pounds per square inch of air, citing anonymous league sources.

"Upon being advised of the investigation, the Patriots promptly pledged their full cooperation and have made their personnel and other information available to us upon request," the NFL statement today read. "Our investigation will seek information from any and all relevant sources and we expect full cooperation from other clubs as well. As we develop more information and are in a position to reach conclusions, we will share them publicly."

The minimum disciplinary action for anyone, including the head coach or other club personnel, who is responsible for a non-approved football is a fine of $25,000, according to the NFL's game operations manual.

The Pats said they are cooperating with the investigation, which comes ahead of the Super Bowl where New England will play the Seattle Seahawks.


Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Colorado Teen Who Tried to Join ISIS Gets Four Years in Prison


Ruskpp/iStock/Thinkstock(DENVER) -- A teenager from Colorado who was caught heading overseas to fight for ISIS was sentenced on Friday in federal court.

The judge referred to Shannon Conley, 19, as "a bit of a mess" when describing her mental state before sentencing her to four years in federal prison.  

The 19-year-old was arrested last year at Denver International Airport on her way to Syria to marry a man she met online, admitting to FBI agents that she was planning use her military training from the U.S. Army Explorers program to help Islamic militants wage holy war on the U.S.

Prosecutors told the court that even in the Denver jail, all Conley wanted to talk about was violent jihad.

Conley pleaded guilty to providing support to a foreign terrorist organization.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Canadian Due in Court Over Killings of Five US Soldiers


jerry2313/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The accused killer of five U.S. soldiers has arrived in New York to face federal terror charges.  

In April 2009, five U.S. soldiers were killed when a truck bomb exploded at the gate of Forward Operating Base Marez in Mosul, Iraq.

Federal prosecutors said Faruq Khalil Muhammed Isa helped orchestrate that attack through a group of Tunisian jihadists.  

He was arrest four years ago in Canada and has now been extradited to the U.S.  

His initial appearance is scheduled for Saturday in Brooklyn, and is the start of what the FBI called an effort to "bring some measure of justice to the families of those five servicemen" killed.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Army Report Finds No Warning Signs That Triggered 2014 Fort Hood Shooting


Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The Army has concluded there were “no clear warning signs” in the military and personnel records of the gunman responsible for last year’s mass shooting at Fort Hood, Texas, that would have indicated he would act violently.

On April 2, 2014 Specialist Ivan Lopez-Lopez went on a shooting spree on the sprawling base that killed three and injured 12 before he took his own life. The investigation found no single event led to the shootings, but it cited “potential contributing factors” that if they had not occurred “might have led to a different result.”

Headed by Lt. General Joseph E. Martz, the investigation concluded: “We find no indication in his medical and personnel records suggesting SPC Lopez-Lopez was likely to commit a violent act" or "sufficient evidence that he pre-planned the shooting.”

In the weeks and months before the shootings Lopez-Lopez was experiencing financial stress and dealing with the emotional blow of the deaths of his mother and grandfather six months before.

However, the report determined, “We cannot reasonably conclude that any single event or stressor, in isolation, was the cause of the shooting. We find that the cumulative effect of these stressors overwhelmed SPC Lopez-Lopez’s ability to effectively cope with them, and led to his irrational, violent outburst.”

Lopez-Lopez had been recently transferred to Fort Hood and upon assignment to his new unit had requested time off, Permissive Temporary Duty (PTDY) to finish his move from his previous posting at Fort Bliss, Texas.

He spent much of April 2 trying to get his time off request processed by his unit’s personnel office, a request they ultimately denied because he had already secured housing in nearby Killeen, Texas.

Later that same day Lopez-Lopez used a recently purchased handgun to begin shooting soldiers assigned to the personnel office, targeting several soldiers “he believed were not supporting his PTDY request.”

Martz’s report says the PTDY request could have been handled better “but we do not find—nor do we intend to create the perception—that personnel in the S-1 shop are to blame for the shooting.” S-1 being the Army acronym for a battalion personnel command.

“No other soldier could reasonably have foreseen that he would react as he did to the denial of his PTDY request, and none of them had the opportunity to stop him,” said the report. “He alone had the opportunity to avoid the shooting, and he chose not to do so.”

The report also found that his unit’s command was in such transition that they “were hampered by a lack of awareness of the stressors affecting him."

The review found “no indication in his medical and personnel records suggesting SPC Lopez-Lopez was likely to commit a violent act.” But it also determined that they could not conclude that if his PTDY request had been granted whether “he would not have reacted violently at some other time.”

Noting the limited interactions that Lopez-Lopez’s commanders had with the newly assigned soldier the report makes several recommendations to improve the level of contacts with new soldiers in their units.

The report recommends further exploration of the idea that soldiers register their personally owned weapons with their commander. Currently, soldiers are required to register their personally owned guns only if they live on base housing.

"This impacts a commander's ability to maintain situational awareness over a service member and their actions involving a firearm that could be concealed and brought onto the installation for unauthorized purposes," said the report.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Dad Posts Meddling Note Sent Home by Teacher over Packed Lunch


PhotoObjects.net/Thinkstock(KIRKSVILLE, Mo.) -- A fed-up Missouri father posted a photo of the letter he received from his daughter's substitute teacher who criticized the girl's lunch.

One problem: the teacher didn't see her whole lunch.

Dr. Justin Puckett was asked to sign a note sent home with his daughter Alia after the teacher saw her eating marshmallows and chocolate at lunch earlier this week.

He refused to do so, and posted it online instead, saying that it was just the latest in what he sees as a growing trend of overreaching by authorities.

"I think that this was just the straw that broke the camel's back for me," Puckett told ABC News.

The substitute teacher wrote in the note sent home on Tuesday that a cafeteria employee said that her lunch consisted of four chocolate bars, a bag of marshmallows, Ritz crackers and a pickle.

"Please see that she packs a proper lunch tomorrow," the teacher wrote. An attempt to reach the teacher for comment wasn't immediately successful.

Puckett told ABC News that, since the note was addressed to "Dr. and Mrs. Puckett," it was clear that the teacher knew he was a physician which he said "just adds to the irony of it all."

What the cafeteria worker and the substitute missed, however, was that the 8-year-old also had four pieces of ham and a low fat string cheese rather than a sandwich, since "we don't eat a lot of bread," said Puckett, who is double board certified in osteopathic family medicine and obesity medicine.

"We leave it up to her and she looks at the school menu and she packs her own lunch and she's a very independent second grader," he told ABC News.

"Sure, I'd liked her to pack a few more veggies and maybe a piece of fruit, but we compromise on pickles occasionally," he wrote in his original Facebook post.

Kirksville, Missouri, school superintendent Damon Kizzire has apologized for the incident and said that the way it's "being blown out of proportion is way out of line with how it was intended. It was all meant with the best of intentions."


Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

11 Rescued After Ship Sinks Off Hawaiian Island


iStock/Thinkstock(HONOLULU) -– Eleven people were rescued on Thursday after a 95-foot towing vessel sank two and half miles off the coast of the Hawaiian island of Oahu, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.

Officials received a call around 3:13 pm HST from the pilot about the towing vessel Nalani, stating their vessel was taking on water, and they were in danger of sinking.

A nearby patrol boat from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and towing vessel Tiger 7 heard the urgent broadcast put out to nearby mariners of the situation and responded to the sinking ship.

The crews on the two boats were able to safely rescue the 11 crew members shortly before two Coast Guard boats arrived on the scene.

All 11 survivors were wearing lifejackets, according to officials.

The cause of the sinking is unknown and remains under investigation.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

The Dangers of a College Student Becoming a Campus Police Drug Informant


Eric Bosco. ABC News(AMHERST, Mass.) -- When Francesca sent her son Logan off to college at University of Massachusetts Amherst, she said they were in constant communication, exchanging phone calls at least once a week and texts every day. She was proud of his accomplishments at school and says he seemed to be thriving.

“He was having so much fun, he really was," Francesca told ABC News' 20/20. "He made a lot of friends."

But what she didn't know was that Logan had been recruited to be a confidential drug informant for the university’s campus police.

And for the first time, Francesca, who asked that her last name not be used, is speaking out about what happened to her son.

Logan Thrives at School

In October 2013, Logan, whose name has been changed, was a junior kinesiology major and a recipient of a prestigious Chancellor’s scholarship at U-Mass Amherst. Growing up, he had been a Boy Scout and an AP student in high school.

“Very happy, always -- jokester, major jokester,” Francesca said of her son’s personality. “He was the life of the party, he really was. ... He was all about helping people.”

Francesca, a real estate agent and a single mom, said she and her son were “very close.” Logan was her only child, and she said she would visit him every Family Weekend in the fall.

She never imagined that when she spoke to Logan the night before she was coming for Family Weekend in October 2013, it was going to be the last time.

A Parent’s Worst Nightmare

On Oct. 4, 2013, Logan’s father, Francesca’s ex-husband, arrived at the school first for Family Weekend and soon discovered something was wrong.

“I was about a half-hour into the drive and his dad was supposed to meet him after his last class and take him to lunch,” Francesca said, noting that her ex-husband called her and said Logan wasn't here he was supposed to meet him.

Francesca’s ex then told her he had gone over to where Logan worked at the campus gym, but couldn't find him.

“He said, "Nobody's seen him,’” she said. “And I told him I just had an awful feeling, and I told him to ‘knock the door down, something has got to be wrong.'"

Logan's father got a maintenance worker to open Logan’s off-campus apartment door. Then he delivered the horrifying news.

“He said, ‘He's not breathing,’” Francesca said through tears. “That's all he was telling me is ‘he's not breathing.’ I said, ‘Call an ambulance,’ and he went from saying, ‘He's not breathing,’ to, ‘He's blue. He's dead.’”

At the time, Logan’s parents had no idea what had happened to their son, who loved hockey and was very athletic.

Francesca said she wasn't naive. She knew her son occasionally drank and smoked marijuana with friends. “I didn't see anything out of the ordinary,” she said. But a more serious offense was when he was arrested when he was 18 years old after police found cocaine residue in a pen in the trunk of his car during a traffic stop.

But Francesca said Logan was enjoying college, and was working towards becoming a physical therapist. She didn't know yet that her son had been tapped to work as a drug informant for campus police.

A Student Reporter Makes a Shocking Discovery

When Logan was found dead, a fellow U-Mass Amherst student named Eric Bosco, along with his classmate Kayla Marchetti, decided to look into the case as a class project for an investigative journalism class. He asked for public records on Logan’s death, which he said they copied and gave him.

Bosco said what he found was shocking. The police records showed details of a night ten months before Logan’s death. He was a sophomore at the time and on Dec. 4, 2012, according to the records, Logan unwittingly sold two tabs of LSD to an undercover campus police officer for $20 and was caught. The records said campus police then raided his bedroom at his apartment.

“They find $700 in cash, an assortment of drugs, and a hypodermic needle,” Bosco said, recounting the records.

The hypodermic needle, which is banned on campus, the drugs and money would have typically led to an arrest, suspension and, as part of school policy, the parents should have been notified that a student was found responsible for a drug or alcohol violation.

But that night, the records showed that campus police decided to do something different for Logan.

“He was offered a chance to help himself by giving information in regards to another drug dealer,” Bosco said. “The offer was they'll drop all charges and they won't charge him with distributing LSD and for the possession of drugs in his room if he wears a wire and goes, makes a controlled buy from a higher-level dealer on campus.”

Becoming 'Confidential Informant No. 8.'

According to campus police records, after Logan agreed to the deal, he is dubbed “Confidential Informant No. 8.” That same night, Dec. 4, 2012, the records say Logan contacted his former roommate, a friend called “Sleepy Dan,” and arranged to buy $70 of LSD while wearing a wire.

Bosco said that, “When [Logan] gets up into the room, he's wearing a wire, he makes the buy, he leaves the room, and detectives swoop in and make the arrest ... in a matter of minutes.”

Logan kept his role as a confidential informant a secret from his mother. Even six months after his death, campus police had not talked openly about the night of Dec. 4, 2012. In fact, Bosco said he was the one who told Francesca that Logan was an informant.

“That was probably the hardest thing I've ever done,” Bosco said. “It was just a powerful, tragic moment.”

Francesca became determined to help Bosco investigate Logan's death, and sent him her son's iPhone. When Bosco began looking through Logan’s text messages, he made another shocking discovery.

“We found a lot,” he said. “This kid hadn't deleted any text messages for a year and a half or two years that he had the phone. ... He was able to essentially speak from the grave.”

Logan’s Phone Reveals His Struggles With Going Undercover

Logan’s texts made it clear that making the deal with campus police had taken a toll. In one text, Logan wrote, “kinda hard to live with myself. ... that was honestly the worst day of my life.” In another he wrote, “I feel like I lost a brother and it [is] all my fault. Kinda wish I was just behind bars right now.”

His phone also revealed a voicemail message left by U-Mass Amherst campus police one month after becoming an informant, which said they were returning the cash they took from his dorm room.

In the months before he died, Logan confided in his childhood friend John Neuwirth.

“He wasn't happy about what he did,” Neuwirth said. “He was ashamed. He felt bad. Anybody would. ... He gets labeled as a snitch, labeled as a rat. It’s basically ostracizing him from the community.”

As the months went on, Logan’s texts showed his drug use had escalated. “I’m a heroin addict,” he confessed to a friend in one text.

Then, in a text to a dealer he wrote 10 months after becoming CI-8, on the night before his parents were coming to visit for Parents Weekend, Logan wrote, “my veins are crying. ... is traffic going too bad?” The dealer wrote back, “you will very soon be in the loving comforting arms of Miss H.”

By the next morning, Logan was dead.

A Mother on a Mission

Francesca is certain her son’s death could have been avoided if she had been given the chance to help him when he was busted for selling LSD on Dec. 4, 2012.

“We should have been called, under the policies and procedures of the university,” Francesca said. “I would have been up there in the middle of the night, bringing him home and finding him help. ... Just knowing there was a syringe, I would have gotten him help. I would have just automatically made an assumption it was heroin.”

According to Bosco, campus police claim that they asked Logan repeatedly if he had a drug problem, and they said he assured them he did not. But his mother is skeptical.

“Nobody wants to believe they have a problem, and no one's going to admit it, especially when you have so much at stake,” she said. “For the police to say, ‘We asked him,’ really? I don't even know what to say to that.”

Francesca launched a mission to hold the university accountable for Logan’s death.

A University Changes Its Policy


Bosco's story about his investigation into Logan’s death landed on the front page of the Boston Globe on Sept. 28, 2014, and led prosecutors to re-open the case. Even the university’s own Vice Chancellor of University Relations John Kennedy, shown here, said he didn’t know the details of Logan’s informant work until Bosco’s report came out.

“We learned through the reporting process,” Kennedy said.

John Kennedy told 20/20 the district attorney has instructed him not to talk about the specifics of this case because it is an ongoing and pending investigation.

He said Logan’s parents weren't notified that Logan had become a drug informant for U-Mass Amherst campus police because the policy on confidential informants protected his identity.

"I would say that this was a revealing moment for us because it caused us to go look at the policy," Kennedy said. "Parental notification was not required as part of the policy. Notification of the administration was not required as a part of the policy. ... that was a shortcoming."

U-Mass Amherst is not the only university with a student drug informant program. University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Campus Police Chief Matthew Kierderlen said they have used 20 CIs since 2012, and it’s made the campus unattractive to drug dealers. But he said students are never coerced into being CIs, they offer do it as a chance to erase drug offenses from their records.

“Our intent is to make this as safe as is possible,” Kierderlen said. “There's certainly always unknowns but we try to account for as much known as we can.”

After what happened to Logan, the university launched an immediate review, Kennedy said, and last week U-Mass Amherst “decided to do away with the use of student confidential informants on this campus.”

In the wake of Logan’s case, amendments to Rachel's Law, which puts restrictions on the use of confidential informants, are currently being debated in both the Florida state House of Representatives and the state Senate that would prohibit university campus police from recruiting or using enrolled students for drug buy-bust operations, but would allow them to provide confidential information. It would also require law enforcement to refer treatment programs to known drug abusers who become confidential informants, and prohibit police from using known drug abusers in buy-bust operations.

For Francesca, the policy change at U-Mass Amherst was a small comfort. She said she is working to bring the heroin dealer who sold the lethal dose to her son to justice. 20/20 learned recently that the phone number of the dealer Logan had been texting the night he died belonged to a paid teacher’s assistant at U-Mass Amherst, according to the university directory. He is no longer at the school, and the open investigation is now in the hands of the district attorney.

The Northwestern District Attorney declined to comment on the investigation into the dealer’s role in Logan’s death.

“Maybe they made [the dealer] a confidential informant,” Francesca said.


Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Maryland Mansion Fire: What Family Did Hours Before Deadly Blaze


Obtained by ABC News(ANNAPOLIS, Md.) -- Two grandparents were enjoying a night out with four of their grandchildren just hours before a deadly blaze tore through the 16,000-square-foot mansion in Annapolis, Maryland, where they all were believed to be staying.

As a special treat, tech executive Don Pyle and his wife, Sandra, took their grandchildren -- Alexis (Lexi) Boone, 8, Kaitlyn (Katie) Boone, 7, Charlotte Boone, 8, and Wesley (Wes) Boone, 6 -- to dinner at the Medieval Times restaurant on Sunday night, according to a family spokeswoman.

The family even stopped by Target before dinner, where they picked up special costumes for the visit to the themed restaurant, the spokeswoman said.

Remains of unidentified bodies have been removed in recent days from the mansion's ashes, where relatives believe all six died in the blaze that started in Monday's early morning hours.

Investigators continue to comb the ashes for remains, as well as clues to the fire's cause, officials have said.

On Friday, members of the Pyle and Boone families offered details about each family member presumed dead in the fire.

Charlotte, 8, was described as “fun-loving and intelligent,” a girl who loved making videos with her pet guinea pig and dreamed of running an animal rescue.

Charlotte's younger brother, Wesley, 6, was described as a “sweet and loving” brother who looked up to his sister and wanted to grow up and build robots, according to the family statement.

Lexi, 8, “wanted to be a vet or on television when she grew up,” read the family statement. She was also very excited about her upcoming communion, the family spokeswoman said.

Alexis’ younger sister, Katie, 7, was said to love Taylor Swift songs and be “loving and thoughtful beyond her years.”

The family described Don and Sandra Pyle as loving grandparents called “Pop-Pop” and “Dee-Dee,” respectively, who loved the local sports teams the Ravens and Orioles, as well as traveling.

In a statement released Thursday, members of the Boone and Pyle families thanked those who have offered them comfort but added, "Our loss demands time and quiet reflection to process these feelings. We ask that you respect our need for privacy."

"Life is fragile," their statement read. "Make time today to embrace your loved ones."

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

KJC Kennel Club


 

Click on the Race Car for

The complete Schedule!


HIT'S FM

103.3 TAWAS

94.9 ALPENA 

For schedule, click on pictures!


   
Carroll Broadcasting

 



American
Country Countdown
with Kix Brooks


Saturday Mornings


The WKJC Birthday 
Anniversary
Club

 

Hey if you have
a birthday or Anniversary
 coming up or 
if you know someone who does, why not let Kevin Allen mention it on the air in his morning Show.  Just click on the link below and we will get it on the air!

 

The WKJC Birthday Club


 

 



Carroll  Broadcasting
Mascot!


JET

2007-2009

"Always in our Heart! "

LinkedUpRadio Envisionwise Web Services