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Ingram Publishing/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- When it comes to consumer complaints about account management and credit cards, Wells Fargo doesn’t at first appear to be much worse than other big banks, despite being the subject of a scandal over the unauthorized opening of accounts.

What the bank does have is a higher number of complaints by amount of credit card loans.

Consumer complaints do not equate to illegal or even improper activity, but the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) uses them as a source of information to determine where they may need to investigate banks further.

Banks other than Wells Fargo appeared to receive a comparable -- and in some cases greater -- number of complaints from consumers, according to a report from S&P Global Market Intelligence.

The report analyzed a database of complaints maintained by the CFPB, which is one of three regulatory agencies which fined Wells Fargo $185 million earlier this month, while alleging that bank "employees opened more than two million deposit and credit card accounts that may not have been authorized by consumers."

The report found that between Jan. 1, 2015 and Sept. 20, 2016, the CFPB received 1,576 complaints regarding "Account opening, closing or management" at Wells Fargo.

By comparison, Citigroup was the subject of 1,722 complaints of the same type; 1,409 were filed by consumers against JPMorgan Chase & Co; and consumers filed 2,119 against Bank of America.

Looking at it a different way, about 1.26 of these complaints were filed for every billion dollars deposited with the company, based on deposit data collected by S&P on June 30th.

This falls right in the middle of four major banks: Citigroup had a ratio of complaints of 1.84 per billion dollars and Bank of America had a rate of 1.74. JPMorgan Chase & Co. was lower at 1.06 complaints per billion deposited.

The report also looked at complaints regarding unsolicited credit cards that were issued, which was at the core of the allegations made against Wells Fargo earlier this month.

Interestingly, Wells Fargo generated the lowest number of these complaints among the four comparable banks -- just 28 between Jan. 1, 2015 and Sept. 20, 2016.

Meanwhile, Citi spurred 83, JPMorgan Chase caused 59 complaints to be filed and Bank of America generated 31.

While Wells Fargo’s number initially appears to be the lowest among the four, when looked at in relation to the amount of credit card loans it makes, it is actually generating more complaints than the other three banks.

It is important to note that these are only consumer complaints and the CFPB has not verified the claims are true.

"We don’t verify all the facts alleged in these complaints," the CFPB states on its website, "but we take steps to confirm a commercial relationship between the consumer and the company."

And while any allegations in the complaints are unproven, the CFPB has said that it can use them as leads to pursue investigations.

"Consumer complaints are the CFPB’s compass and play a central role in everything we do. They help us identify and prioritize problems for potential action," CFPB Director Richard Cordray said in July 2015.

Spokesperson for Wells Fargo, Citigroup, and JPMorgan Chase & Co. did not immediately return ABC News' requests for comment.

A spokeswoman for Bank of America declined to comment.

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ABC News(COLUMBUS, Neb.) -- Avon, the direct-selling company for beauty products, first started employing women as sales representatives 130 years ago, in 1886 -- that's 34 years before women earned the right to vote.

Opal Greene’s history with the company goes far back as well. She received her first brochure from Avon in July of 1962. Today, more than 50 years later, she is 94 years old and still going strong.

She now has a friend helping her out but she still goes door to door to her customers every two weeks in Columbus, Nebraska, and passes out about 40 catalogs each time.

Her customers are no longer just customers -- they're dear friends.

"I love them and they love me too," she told ABC News.

This interaction, according to her grandson, Ben Greene, is what keeps her going.

“I just can’t say enough about her determination. She’s built so many great relationships with people and it’s not just about selling lipsticks anymore,” he said. "To be honest, I don't know if there's one person in Columbus that doesn't know my grandmother."

Greene is a tough cookie. She’s endured a plane crash, a brain aneurysm, colon cancer, and a year and a half ago, a car accident.

“I walked around selling Avon two days before,” she said of the time she was diagnosed with a brain aneurysm.

Will she ever stop selling products for the beauty company? “When my day is up, I imagine,” she said.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  Almost 25 years after "Mrs. Doubtfire" was filmed, the home used in the famed Robin Williams comedy is on the market for $4.45 million.

The 4-bedroom, 3,300-square foot home, located in San Francisco, was used by Williams' character, Mrs. Doubtfire, so that he could be close to his kids during a tumultuous divorce.

The listing, by realtor Steve Gothelf, features plenty of pics and exclusive looks from the inside of the house.

 It has changed a bit, of course, with a "remodeled kitchen" and "lower-level family room or office with hardwood floors and remodeled full bath with shower" since the film's 1993 release.

Williams committed suicide in 2014 and local San Francisco news site SF Gate adds that the home is "a shrine of sorts" to the late comedian, with flowers often left on the sidewalk.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — There's a lot of appeal in the idea of a volunteer vacation: giving back while getting away, getting to know the "real" people of a the place you're visiting and using your skills to help others.

But volunteer vacations are being questioned on how much good they actually do the local population, and at the same time, volunteering overall has become less popular, according to the most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In the year ending September 2015, the number of Americans who volunteered had declined from the previous year.

Still, many travelers are interested in being more than tourists.

Rob Harper, co-owner and director of business development at Namu Travel, said his clients are excited about giving a day of their vacation over to the local community. The company, which interviews each client before putting together their trip itinerary, books trips to Nicaragua, Panama and Costa Rica.

"It's not that people don't want to give a week or more to volunteer," he said, "but logistically that can be very difficult. When they find out we can book it for them, they build it into their trip."

For example, clients who fly into San Jose, Costa Rica, have the opportunity to volunteer in a soup kitchen in Alajuelita for a full or half day. The client has transportation to and from the soup kitchen.

"They pay for the experience," Harper said. "Let's face it, these places need your time and your money."

In Nicaragua, guests that book the Jicaro Island Ecolodge have the opportunity to visit a school on a nearby island where the children have outdated books and limited bathroom facilities. "The client may plan ahead and coordinate with the school on bringing down the supplies they need, or they can participate in a clean-up effort," Harper said.

Even cruise ships, primarily associated -- whether fairly or not -- with high seas hi-jinks are getting in on giving back. In June 2015, Carnival Corp. debuted the new brand Fathom, with itineraries that are either Cuba or Dominican Republic-based. The Cuba trips are based on cultural immersion, but the trips to the DR are focused on volunteering. Cruisers can participate in activities ranging from supporting English language skills -- a skill demanded by the local tourism industry -- to working in a women's cooperative to pouring the foundation in community homes.

The "impact activities" range in price from free to $20.

For those who don't want to give up time off, there's a new way to book travel and donate to a charity of choice. Book Here, Give Here was started by Loulu Lima last year and donates to vetted charities with each booking. It's no cost to the client, she said, and instead comes out of the company's commission. Group, wedding and corporate travelers can customize their charitable donation.

The company also asks suppliers to match the donation, potentially doubling the impact.

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Thaxton Family/ABC News(WASHINGTON) — The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has issued a warning about certain top-loading Samsung washing machines after reports that some had exploded, ABC News has learned exclusively.

The agency said it is working with Samsung on a remedy to fix the issue that apparently affects some units made between March 2011 and April 2016.

At first, Melissa Thaxton, 32, of Dallas, Ga. thought her Samsung washing machine was a lifesaver.

“It was just perfect,” Thaxton said.

But she says that changed on the morning of April 8, 2016. Thaxton says she was standing next to the running machine when it exploded.

“It was the loudest sound. It sounded like a bomb went off in my ear,” Thaxton said. “There were wires, nuts, the cover actual was laying on the floor.”

Thaxton says what made it even more frightening was that her then- 4-year-old son, Luke, was right next to her.

“I just remember covering my head and leaning towards my son and just screaming this scream that I didn’t even know I could scream,” she said.

In a similar case in Holly Springs, NC, Sarah Price, said her two-month-old top loading Samsung washing machine flew apart, too.

“Any one of us could’ve been in here,” Price said.

These aren’t the only cases.

GMA Investigates has learned that since early last year, 21 people have reported to the CPSC that their top-loading Samsung washing machines have exploded or blown apart.

Thaxton and several other plaintiffs are suing Samsung in federal court in New Jersey. Their lawyer, Jason Lichtman, argues that a support rod in the top-loading Samsung washing machine is insufficient to hold the tub in place and can become unfastened during the spin cycle.

“The rod can slide right out,” Lichtman said. “And that’s what causes the washing machine to blow apart.”

In a statement late yesterday Samsung told GMA Investigates: “In rare cases, affected units may experience abnormal vibrations that could pose a risk of personal injury or property damage when washing bedding, bulky or water-resistant items. It is important to note that Samsung customers have completed hundreds of millions of loads without incident since 2011.”

Until the remedy to this safety issue is in place, the CPSC and Samsung Wednesday are advising consumers to only use the delicate cycle when washing bedding and bulky items. They say the lower speed lessens the risk of impact injuries or property damage due to the washing machine becoming dislodged. Consumers can contact Samsung for more information and to determine if they have an affected washing machine.

Thaxton said that Samsung offered her a refund, but she said she’s taking it to court instead because she wants to warn other people about the problem.

“If that would have hit my child there is no telling. It would have been catastrophic,” Thaxton said. “And that’s why I’m speaking out.”


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Raymond Boyd/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Two days before Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf was set to testify at a House hearing over an accounts scandal that has gripped the company, the bank's independent directors have announced that he will forgo $41 million worth of promised compensation as well as his usual salary as it launches an investigation.

The directors also announced that Carrie Tolstedt, who until July was the head of Wells Fargo's community banking division -- where workers opened bank and credit accounts using customer information without permission -- has left the company.

She was slated to leave at "year's end," according to a retirement announcement.

Tolstedt, who has been the subject of scrutiny in recent weeks, will not receive a bonus for the year and will not receive severance pay, the directors said in a statement. Similar to Stumpf, she will forgo promised share compensation worth about $19 million.

Stumpf, who has been CEO since 2007, will also not receive a bonus, the statement said.

Separately, in remarks prepared for Stumpf's appearance before the House Financial Services Committee on Thursday, which were obtained and reviewed by ABC, the CEO is expected to say that the bank is moving up the date it will end its controversial sales program from Jan. 1, 2017 to Oct. 1, 2016.

The compensation and investigation announcement comes as Wells Fargo attempts to recover from a scandal that kicked off on Sept. 8, when regulators alleged that employees opened or applied for accounts without customers' knowledge or permission.

A portion of the accounts generated more than $2 million in fees, according to Consumer Financial Protection Bureau documents, and some 5,300 employees were fired, authorities said.

The company was fined $185 million and a federal investigation has been launched. The Los Angeles city attorney said that bank workers were opening the accounts to receive monetary rewards by meeting sales goals.

On Sept. 8, the company issued a statement which said, "we regret and take responsibility for any instances where customers may have received a product that they did not request."

The directors did not rule out that previous compensation could be clawed back, as some have called for.

"Based on the results of the investigation, the Independent Members of the Board will take such other actions as they collectively deem appropriate, which may include further compensation actions," Lead Independent Director Stephen Sanger said in the statement, where he noted that "clawbacks" were on the table.

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HEIKO JUNGE/AFP/Getty Images(GUADALAJARA, Mexico) -- Humans could set foot on Mars within the next 10 years -- at least if SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has his way.

The billionaire entrepreneur, who also happens to be the CEO of Tesla Motors, chairman of renewable energy company Solar City and co-founder of PayPal, Tuesday unveiled his ambitious plan for colonizing the Red Planet.

His concept -- which he offhandedly admits amounts to a “fairly significant technical challenge” (it is rocket science, after all) -- involves building and launching a 400-foot carbon-fiber spacecraft, sending a reusable rocket to refuel it mid-orbit, then deploying the spaceship’s built-in solar array and sending it off on a 3- to 4-month journey to Mars, only to be refueled by methane gas produced on Mars and sent back to Earth.

Musk’s so-called “interplanetary transport system” is designed to dramatically reduce the cost of the trip, currently estimated at around $10 billion per person, to just $200,000 or so per person, the 45-year-old explained at the International Astronautical Congress in Guadalajara, Mexico. Eventually, he hopes to build up a “fleet” of 1,000 or more, each carrying 100 to 200 passengers bound for a new life on Mars.

In Musk’s view, a self-sustaining Martian city could serve as humankind’s insurance policy against a “doomsday event” which could out intelligent life on our home planet.

But for those first intrepid explorers -- who Musk has repeatedly compared to America’s early colonists -- the trip will be a perilous one.

"Basically, are you prepared to die?" Musk asked. "If that’s okay, you know, you’re a candidate for going."

Once you get over the fear of death, of course, “it’d be, like, really fun to go!” Musk said, noting that his plan includes movie screenings and lectures en route.

Eventually, SpaceX wants to send a million people to Mars, a feat Musk believes they could achieve within about 100 years of the first manned mission, which could be launched as early as 2024.

Building such a complex system will cost a lot of money -- so much that Musk hasn’t yet named a dollar figure. But funding the dream is the main reason Musk is “personally accumulating assets,” he said -- and once they make some progress, he hopes public support will “snowball.”

(Tuesday's announcement, however, comes just weeks after a high-profile, dramatic explosion on the launch pad in Cape Canaveral, which destroyed one of SpaceX's Falcon 9 rockets and its payload. The company has since said a helium system breach is likely to blame for the "anomaly," and announced it would return to flight as early as November.)

Travel to Mars “would be an incredible adventure,” Musk mused. “I think it would be the most inspiring thing that I could possibly imagine.”

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- In a letter to Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer Tuesday, six Democratic senators have asked the tech company to provide further details of a massive data breach the company revealed last week, including when exactly the company became aware of it.

Since the hack was publicly revealed on Sept. 22, questions have mounted over Yahoo’s handling of the data breach, including what it knew and when, and whether it violated securities laws by not disclosing news of the hack earlier.

More: Senator Questions Yahoo's Handling of Data Breach Disclosure, Calls for SEC Investigation

Yahoo said when it announced the breach that a “recent investigation” led them to believe that data associated with 500 million accounts was stolen from its servers in late 2014 by a “state-sponsored actor.” The company has not been specific about when it first detected the breach.

The company said that the stolen data may have included password information, names, email addresses, dates of birth and telephone numbers.

“This is highly sensitive, personal information that hackers can use not only to access Yahoo customer accounts, but also potentially to gain access to any other account or service that users access with similar login or personal information, including bank information and social media profiles,” the senators wrote in the letter to Mayer.

“We are even more disturbed that user information was first compromised in 2014, yet the company only announced the breach last week," the senators added. "That means millions of Americans’ data may have been compromised for two years.”

The letter was signed by Sens. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., Al Franken, D-Minn., Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and Edward Markey, D-Mass.

The senators said it was “unacceptable” that there was a nearly two-year gap between the time when the hack is believed to have taken place and when it was revealed. They asked Yahoo to brief their staff "on the company’s investigation into the breach, its interaction with appropriate law enforcement and national security authorities, and how it intends to protect affected users.”

The lawmakers also demanded a timeline "detailing the nature of the breach, when and how it was discovered, when Yahoo notified law enforcement or other government authorities about the breach, and when Yahoo notified its customers."

They asked if anyone within the U.S. government had warned Yahoo "of a possible hacking attempt by state-sponsored hackers or other bad actors," and if so, when that warning took place.

"Press reports indicate the breach first occurred in 2014, but was not discovered until August of this year," the senators added. "If this is accurate, how could such a large intrusion of Yahoo's systems have gone undetected?"

In early August, multiple media reports surfaced claiming that a hacker identifying himself or herself as “Peace” was attempting to sell information associated with some 200 million Yahoo accounts on the dark web. Those claims were reported by the BBC, Ars Technica, and Motherboard, among others.

Shortly after the breach was revealed last Thursday, a source familiar with the matter who requested anonymity as they were not permitted to speak publicly about the matter, told ABC News in an email that Yahoo launched an internal investigation "following a report earlier this summer (July 2016) of a hacker indicating that 280 million user credentials were for sale on the black market."

According to the source, the company "found no evidence to substantiate the hacker’s claims," but when an internal security team broadened the scope of its investigation, “they identified evidence of the theft by a state-sponsored actor occurred in 2014.”

The source did not make clear when the discovery of the data breach revealed on Sept. 22 was made.

The Financial Times, a U.K. newspaper, published a report on Friday, citing an unnamed source that made very similar claims about how Yahoo discovered the massive breach.

“The initial investigation found no evidence for the claim in July by a hacker known as Peace that details of more than 200m accounts had been accessed, this person said, but concern about the allegation triggered a deeper probe,” the newspaper reported. “That investigation uncovered what Yahoo on Thursday called a state-sponsored hack affecting more than 500m accounts.”

“Marissa Mayer has known since July that Yahoo was investigating allegations of a serious data breach,” The Financial Times reported. ABC News has not been able to independently verify this detail.

In a statement issued on Friday, Yahoo said: “As we disclosed yesterday, a recent investigation by Yahoo has confirmed that a copy of certain user account information was stolen from our systems in late 2014 by what we believe is a state-sponsored actor. Our investigation into this matter is ongoing and the issues are complex.”

“Some things, however, are clear: Yahoo has never had reason to believe there is any connection between the security issue disclosed yesterday and the claims publicized by a hacker in August 2016. Conflating the two events is inaccurate,” the statement also said.

The senators’ letter Tuesday comes a day after Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., asked the Securities and Exchange Commission to investigate whether Yahoo “fulfilled its obligations under federal securities laws to keep the public and investors informed.” Warner was not among the signatories of the letter sent Tuesday.

“Press reports indicate Yahoo’s CEO, Marissa Mayer, knew of the breach as early as July of this year,” Warner wrote in the letter to SEC Chairwoman Mary Jo White. “Despite the historic scale of the breach, however, the company failed to file a Form 8-K disclosing the breach to the public.”

“Disclosure is the foundation of federal securities laws, and public companies are required to disclose material events that shareholders should know about via Form 8-K within four business days,” Warner added.

Yahoo did file a Form 8-K with the SEC on Sept. 22 pointing investors to a news release it issued, in which the company revealed the data breach.

Yahoo and Verizon announced on July 25 that Verizon would acquire Yahoo for around $4.83 billion. That deal is still pending.

On Sept. 22, the day the breach was revealed, Verizon released a statement saying that it found out about it "within the last two days."

"We understand that Yahoo is conducting an active investigation of this matter, but we otherwise have limited information and understanding of the impact," Verizon said in that statement. "We will evaluate as the investigation continues through the lens of overall Verizon interests, including consumers, customers, shareholders and related communities. Until then, we are not in position to further comment."

Yahoo did not immediately return a request for comment on the letter sent Tuesday by the six senators.

Yahoo is a content partner of ABC News.

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JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Almost two weeks after announcing an official government recall of its Note7 smartphones, Samsung said on Tuesday that more than 60 percent of the phones sold in the U.S. that were affected by the battery issue have been exchanged or replaced.

Users of the affected Note7 smartphones could choose between a replacement of the same model, exchange for a different model or a refund.

Samsung said on Tuesday that about 90 percent of owners have elected to receive a replacement of the same model.

The statistics were announced six days after replacement Note7 smartphones became available in the U.S. At that time, the company said that about 130,000 of the approximately 1 million affected devices in the U.S. had been exchanged.

Owners who have not exchanged their phones now face nagging warning messages and a cap on how much they can charge the batteries after the company rolled out a software update for affected devices.

The government recall, announced on Sept. 15, and Samsung's exchange program followed several reports that Note7 smartphones were exploding or catching fire. When the official recall was announced, government officials said that "Samsung has received 92 reports of the batteries overheating in the U.S., including 26 reports of burns and 55 reports of property damage, including fires in cars and a garage."

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Investors were pleased with the outcome of the first presidential debate as stocks boasted moderate gains Tuesday.

The Dow jumped 133.47 ( 0.74 percent) to finish at 18,228.30.

The Nasdaq gained 48.22 ( 0.92 percent) to close at 5,305.71, while the S&P 500 finished at 2,159.93, up 13.83 ( 0.64 percent) from its open.

Crude oil sunk 3 percent with prices hitting above $44 a barrel.

Presidential Debate: Stocks and currencies called Monday night's debate for Hillary Clinton by posting gains on Wall Street. Investors see Clinton as a “known commodity,” and they can anticipate what her policies will look like, while Trump “is a wild card” and against the status quo for investors.

The U.S. dollar and the Mexican peso also had a bump from the debate results.

Winners and Losers: EndoChoice Holdings Inc.'s stock skyrocketed 89 percent on news that Boston Scientific Corp. would acquire the medical device-making company for $210 million.

Shares in Caesars Entertainment Corporation sunk 19 percent after the gaming corporation announced it had agreed on a reorganization deal with its major creditor groups.

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U.S. Food and Drug Administration(NEW YORK) -- The New York-based Mt. Kisco Smokehouse has announced a voluntary recall of two types of smoked salmon products over concerns they could be contaminated with Listeria bacteria.

The products were distributed in New York and Connecticut between Sept. 6 and Sept. 16, according to a company statement released by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Monday. No illnesses have been reported in connection to the recalled products.

Hernan Hurtado, vice president of Mt. Kisco Smokehouse, told ABC News Tuesday that the bacteria was found in a drain and floor cracks during a routine inspection by the FDA.

Hurtado said that, after an extensive cleaning, the company brought in technicians who "conducted a thorough swabbing for listeria."

"The whole place was swabbed and we're clean right now," he said.

Concerned customers can contact the company at 914-244-0702, Monday through Saturday 9:00 am to 5:30 pm EST.

The whole fish product was packed in unlabeled paper boxes and delivered to restaurants, according to the company's statement. The sliced product was sold in a clear plastic package and labeled on the back with lot numbers and "Use By" dates as follows:

Atlantic Smoked Salmon Whole

  • lot # 13723516 USE BY 09 12 16
  • lot # 12125316 USE BY 09 30 16

Sliced – Smoked ATLANTIC SALMON, Net Wt. 8 Oz (225.89)

  • lot # 12125116 USE BY 09 28 16
  • lot # 12125216 USE BY 09 29 16
  • lot # 11325716 USE BY 10 03 16
  • lot # 11325816 USE BY 10 05 16

The company issued the recall as a precaution, though no food products have been confirmed to be contaminated.

Listeria contamination, caused by the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, can cause dangerous infections, especially in pregnant women or people with compromised immune systems.

Symptoms of the foodborne illness include fever, muscle aches, diarrhea and other gastrointestinal symptoms. In severe cases, the infections can cause stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Nearly everyone infected with the bacteria ends up with an invasive infection, meaning it moves outside the gastrointestinal tract.

The disease causes 1,600 illnesses and 260 deaths every year in the U.S., according to the latest CDC statistics from 2011. In pregnant women, the infection is associated with miscarriage and stillbirth.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Jeans are a wardrobe staple, simple and timeless, but they’re now featuring new technology.

Good Housekeeping's style director Lori Bergamotto appeared on Good Morning America on Tuesday to discuss the latest in denim technology -- including stain-resistant white jeans, jeans that create a butt-lifting illusion, combination yoga pants/jeans as well as leggings that take the wearer’s measurements and suggest suitable brands and styles of jeans.

Bergamotto shares why these jeans are on her radar, in her own words.

The Jeans


1. Women's Mid-Rise Stay White Rockstar Skinny Jeans from Old Navy featuring stain-resistant technology ($44.94): Bergamotto spilled Coke on the jeans. Rather than becoming absorbed into the fabric, the soda easily rolled off the garment.

Bergamotto: "White jeans after Labor Day? Of course! And, thanks to [this] technology, you can wear yours all year long without worrying about stains and spills. Most messes—especially water-based ones like coffee, soda, and wine—will trickle right down without leaving a residue. The Good Housekeeping Institute Textiles Lab tested these and found that with just some light blotting and the proper washing, the stains do not absorb into the fabric the way they would on most cotton garments."

2. NYDJ Uplift Alina Legging with optical pocket ($134): With strategically placed seams, these jeans are designed to give the butt a boost.

Bergamotto: "Want a lifted tush without having to do 300 squats a day to get it? These strategically designed jeans with an optic pocket design give the appearance of a higher, rounder bottom. And, while it lifts up your booty, it even slims the rest of your body with compression technology. Available in Sizes 0 – 18."

3. Smart Leggings from Like a Glove ($69): Once you put them on, the technology in the garment will take your measurements and send them to a corresponding app that will search a database to find the type of jeans that are right for your shape, Bergamotto said.

Bergamotto: "These are not just your average stretchy leggings. They are 'smart' leggings that take the guesswork out of finding your exact size. No more being stymied by European cuts or vanity sizing, these leggings contain special fibers that scan the measurements and contours of your waist, bottom, thighs and more in order to find you the perfect denim matches from a catalog of available brands via an app in your smart phone."

4. Lee's Dream Jeans ($34.90): They’re yoga pants and jeans combined, making them comfortable and functional, Bergamotto said.

Bergamotto: "There's a reason these are aptly named the 'Dream Jean.' They feel like yoga pants, but look like jeans! With a special stretch fabric and moisture-wicking lining, this comfy denim offers the style of skinny jeans without the binding, waist and unforgiving fabric."


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McDonald's of Michigan(POTTERVILLE, Mich.) -- In a funny occurrence, one set of quintuplets are working for the same McDonald's restaurant together near their Michigan home.

Leith, Lauren, Logan, Lindsey and Lucas Curtis, arrived in that order on Feb. 20, 1998.

The now-18-year-old high school seniors are all part-time employees at the same McDonald's location in Potterville.

"The first two came on a little over a year ago and when I interviewed [Lucas], he talked about the fact that he was a quintuplet," Renee Draves, the McDonald's owner and operator, told ABC News. "They've been able to train each other. They're phenomenal. The thing that's so impressive about them is just how positive their attitudes are and how well they're working together."

She added: "To see the way these siblings get along is amazing."

Lucas was hired last year followed by his sister Lauren, and the other three came on about six months later.

The siblings work the front counter, in the kitchen and maintain the cleanliness of the restaurant lobby, Draves said.

All five teens share one car and drive one another to work, unless mom Lori and dad Leith are helping out on the weekends.

"It's been an experience and a challenge with the different personalities," Lori Curtis of Dimondale, Michigan told ABC News of her children. "It's just been fun."

Curtis said her quintuplets are working to save up for their college educations next fall.

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Pool/Getty Images(HEMPSTEAD, N.Y.) -- When Hillary Clinton attacked Donald Trump for not releasing his tax returns and allegedly paying zero in federal income taxes, the Republican presidential nominee had just four words to say in response.

“That makes me smart,” Trump said from the debate stage at Hofstra University Monday night.

Trump has said repeatedly he is being audited by the IRS and cannot release his tax statements until the review is concluded. But during the first presidential debate in Hempstead, New York, the real estate mogul vowed to release his tax returns “against my lawyer’s wishes” if Clinton releases emails she deleted from a private server she used while she was secretary of state.

“As soon as she releases her 33,000 e-mails that have been deleted, as soon as she releases them,” Trump said Monday night, amid cheers and applause, “I will release my tax returns.”

The White House hopefuls also clashed repeatedly over their tax plans during the debate, with Clinton accusing Trump of proposing the “most extreme version” of “trickle-down economics.”

“The biggest tax cuts for the top percent of the people in county than we’ve ever had,” the Democratic presidential nominee said from the stage. “I call it trumped-up trickle-down because that’s exactly what it would be. That is not how we grow the economy.”

Before Trump had a chance to defend his tax policy, Clinton took another jab.

“Donald was very fortunate in his life and that's all to his benefit,” she continued. “He started his business with $14 million, borrowed from his father, and he really believes that the more you help wealthy people, the better off we'll be and that everything will work out from there. I don't buy that.”

Trump, who released his tax plan earlier this month, has proposed tax cuts across the board, including income tax reductions for the top 1 percent and eliminating federal estate tax as well as gift taxes.

Meanwhile, Clinton has called for tax hikes for the wealthiest Americans and closing corporate loopholes that allow the rich to evade some tariffs.

Trump fired back, blaming “politicians like Secretary Clinton” for plunging the nation into debt.

“We’re a debtor nation,” he said. “We have a country that needs new roads, new tunnels, new bridges, new airports, new schools, new hospitals. And we don’t have the money because it’s been squandered on so many of your ideas.”

Clinton suggested that Trump’s alleged failure to pay federal income tax might also be part of the problem. But Trump quickly argued any taxes he would have paid would have gone to waste.

“It would be squandered too, believe me,” he said.

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Two former Wells Fargo employees have filed a lawsuit against the bank related to the unauthorized accounts scandal that has engulfed the institution in controversy. The plaintiffs are seeking class-action status for the lawsuit.

The suit, filed on Sept. 22 in California Superior Court by former employees Alexander Polonsky and Brian Zaghi, seeks to represent employees or former employees who worked for the bank during the last 10 years and who, the suit alleges, were “either demoted, forced to resign, or terminated,” for not meeting “impossible” quotas the bank set as goals for employees to open accounts on behalf of customers.

The lawsuit, which is seeking at least $2.6 billion in damages, notes that Wells Fargo is incorporated in Delaware, but its principal place of business is San Francisco.

The two plaintiffs say they did not engage in any of the alleged misconduct -- referred to as “gaming” in the suit -- and were thus unable to achieve “impossible” quotas and in turn were “counseled, demoted and later terminated,” the suit alleges.

“In order to be able to perpetrate their fraudulent scam, Wells Fargo fired employees who did not meet their impossible quotas,” the suit said.

The suit alleges that the bank set a sales goals for employees that expected them to open 10 accounts per day and work to ensure that every existing customer had eight accounts to their name.

The quotas, or sales goals, at the heart of the suit, have been central to the scandal that has rocked the bank since it was revealed on Sept. 8.

Here's a timeline of the Wells Fargo Accounts Scandal.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, one of a handful of regulators that fined the bank a combined $185 million on Sept. 8, said at the time that the bank implemented the goals because it “sought to distinguish itself in the marketplace as a leader in 'cross-selling' banking products and services to its existing customers.”

In turn, according to the Los Angeles City Attorney, another regulator that imposed part of the fine, employees were opening and funding accounts on customers’ behalf without their knowledge or consent, in order to "satisfy sales goals and earn financial rewards under the bank's incentive-compensation program."

Since then, the bank has promised to end the sales goals program, saying on Sept. 13 that the program would cease to exist effective Jan. 1, 2017.

The lawsuit filed by the former employees alleges that “Wells Fargo’s fraudulent scam which was set at the top and directed toward the bottom was to squeeze employees to the breaking point so they would cheat customers so that the CEO could drive up the value of Wells Fargo stock and put hundreds of millions of dollars in his own pocket.”

“Wells Fargo could then place the blame on thousands of $12 an hour employees who were just trying to meet cross-sell quotas that made the CEO rich,” the suit alleges.

The lawsuit filed by the former employees follows one filed on Sept. 19 by three customers who say they were affected by the alleged misconduct.

It also comes just days before Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf is expected to testify in front of the House Financial Services Committee on Thursday.

At a Senate hearing on Sept. 20, Stumpf faced blistering comments from both sides of the aisle, with Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., saying Stumpf "should resign" and face a criminal probe.

“You should give back the money that you gained while this scam was going on, and you should be criminally investigated by the [Department of Justice] and the [Securities and Exchange Commission]," Warren said during the tense Sept. 20 hearing.

Wells Fargo declined to comment Monday this latest lawsuit.

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